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Sunday, January 29, 2017

What Is a Neti Pot and How Do You USe IT

A Neti Pot helps to relieve pain, pressure and congestion by liquefying the excess mucous in your nasal passages and flushing it out. The tiny hairs located in the nasals passage known as cilia become stale and need to have bacteria, allergens and other irritants flushed out. Dry sinuses are a breeding ground for infection. 

Sinus problems are caused by "breakdown in normal function and protective role of the nasal cavity" It is the lining of the nasala cavity that helps protect the upper respiratory system against infection by viruses and bacteria. When there is not enough mucus or it does not do the task then sinus symptoms result. That is where a Neti pot comes in to help rinse the nasal area and help mucus do its job

What You’ll Need

  1. Neti pot
  2. Non-iodized salt
  3. Warm water (more or less body temperature)
  4. 1/4 teaspoon


  1. Wash your neti pot with warm soap and water before first use and after each use.
  2. Fill the pot with warm water. The water should be around body temperature, so when you feel it with your finger, it should not feel cold or hot.  Added:  Many people use straight from the tap but to be completely safe I use filtered water, you can use distilled as well.  There may be water-born diseases – not to mention chlorine! – in tap water.
  3. Mix in 1/4-1/2 teaspoon salt.  Be sure to use non-iodized salt without additives or anti-caking agents.  You can buy “neti pot salt” – some are sea salt with more minerals in them and thus feel more mild (I like them better).  Start with 1/4 teaspoon on your first try, but then experiment – you may find you like a little bit more.  I use somewhere in between 1/4 and 1/2.
  4. Lean your face forward over the sink, and then tilt your head to the right.  I was terrified I was going to do this wrong the first time!  But really, it’s ok if you don’t have this “right” – you’re not going to screw it up and you’ll get a feel for this quickly.
  5. Place the neti pot spout inside your right nostril.  Make sure you form a seal with your nostril so it doesn’t leak.
  6. Breathe through your mouth.  Don’t forget to breathe – oxygen is important!
  7. Tilt the pot until water starts to pour out of your left nostril.  Keep pouring until the pot is empty.  I usually have to pause about half-way through to gently blow out the water and gunk, and then I start pouring again.
  8. Relax your neck and shoulders.  No other instructions say this, but boy I tense up when I’m trying to do this right.  Relax – it’s not that hard, you won’t screw it up (and if you do it doesn’t really matter), there’s no reason to be tense.
  9. Repeat #2-8 on the other side.
  10. Exhale through both nostrils into the sink, and then gently blow your nose.  The pot came with instructions to do crazy hand-to-toe exercises afterwards.  I found a couple gentle blows of the nostrils is good.

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